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Tag: review

Little Women breathes new life into into the Classic Novel

Louisa May Alcott’s book has been adapted many times, and as recently as the mid-nineties, so Greta Gerwig had to bring something very special to the screen in order to justify yet one more retelling… read more
Posted in Family, Film, Review

Downton Abbey film - a lavishly produced treat for the series many fans

Fans of Downton Abbey won’t be disappointed by this big screen opportunity to catch up with old friends. Gifted a bigger budget, Julian Fellowes’s drama about upstairs/downstairs has been turned from a show where thoughtful… read more
Posted in Film, Review

The Blues Band are better than ever in concert & on their new album

The Blues Band, and permutations of its constituent parts have come to Diss quite a few times but I don’t recall them ever playing quite so well. The reason may be The Rooster Crowed, their… read more
Posted in Music, Review

A triumphant and life affirming return for Paul Sinha

Paul Sinha made a real impact at the Corn Hall last year - he seemed to enjoy the evening as much as his audience did - so perhaps it’s no surprise that his return was… read more
Posted in Comedy

Hazel O’Connor held her audience spellbound

Given the revival of interest in eighties music it’s no surprise that Hazel O’Connor played to a full house at the Corn Hall. But to attribute her success merely to nostalgia would be to greatly… read more
Posted in Diss, Music

Another chance to see Fleabag on the big screen - it's a terrifically entertaining showcase for Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s considerable talents

I wonder how many others were belatedly catching up with Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s extraordinary Edinburgh debut back in 2013, kicking themselves that, at the time, they went to see something else instead? Given the global success… read more
Posted in Review, Screening

Cast your prejudices aside, you’ll be cheering over this heart-warming tale with family, East Anglia & wrestling at its heart

If you’re wondering whether a film about wrestling is for you, then wonder no more, and not just because it largely takes place in East Anglia. This heart-warming tale of a close knit, loving family… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Roughcast's rumbustious romp of A Midsummer Night's Dream features a scene-stealing, marvellously exuberant Bottom

A Midsummer Night’s Dream RoughCast Theatre Company has never been afraid to take on challenging writing, tackling everything from Ibsen to Orton, and in their latest production they take on that most formidable of oxymorons,… read more
Posted in live entertainment, Review, Theatre

All is True - Branagh & Dench are magnificent in this film which seeks to explain the great mystery of why Shakespeare retired so suddenly

All is True (12A) Kenneth Branagh’s career is so closely associated with Shakespeare, it was perhaps inevitable that he would one day play the man himself. To that extent this is very much Branagh’s film,… read more
Posted in Film, Review

The Favourite - screening next Wednesday - is an eccentric, intriguing delight from beginning to end

The Favourite (15) - a review Set in the court of Queen Anne, the last of the Stuart monarchs, Yorgos Lanthimos’s quirky, profane and shamelessly anachronistic period drama is an eccentric, intriguing delight from beginning… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Next Wednesday: Bohemian Rhapsody - with a roster of superb concert recreations - is hugely enjoyable

After the much-publicised troubles that have beset this movie, it comes as a pleasant surprise that Bohemian Rhapsody is such a fun ride, with a roster of superb concert recreations, including Life Aid – where… read more
Posted in Film, Music, Review

Gillian Anderson and Lily James - superb in the National Theatre live screening of All About Eve

This adaption of a 1950s movie films its actors while they perform live, projecting them onto a screen, while yet more the actors perform live on stage - all of which has then been filmed… read more
Posted in Review, Screening, Theatre

Mary Poppins flies into the Corn Hall this Wednesday

Mary Poppins Returns Fans of the original Mary Poppins who approach this belated sequel with some trepidation need not worry. The film has been created with them in mind as much as a family audience… read more
Posted in Family, Film, Review

The Pantaloons inventive reworking of The Odyssey is a triumph!

The Pantaloons are no strangers to the inventive re-working of classic texts, but this must be their most ambitious attempt to date. Slimming down Homer’s epic Greek poem into two hours of knockabout fun is… read more
Posted in Arts Award, Review, Theatre

Super Happy Story - genuinely good theatre with real emotional impact

A Super Happy Story (about feeling super sad)  A musical about depression and self-harm is not an easy sell. It takes imagination to write, empathy to perform, and courage to programme. Silent Uproar’s collaboration with… read more
Posted in Review, Theatre

Stranger than fiction, Wednesday's film BlacKkKlansman, is probably the best Spike Lee film in 20 years

Probably the best Spike Lee film in 20 years, this stranger than fiction story of a black man infiltrating the Ku Klux Klan mixes absurd comedy with jaw-dropping racism to brilliant effect. Both a social… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Luke Wright's latest show – Poet Laureate - is unusually thoughtful and moving

Following in the wake of his ambitious play/poems of recent years, Luke Wright’s latest show might at first appear a tad conventional, but there was a lot more going on here than just a collection… read more
Posted in Luke Wright, Review, Word

Hotel Salvation - anyone who has spent time with an ageing parent will find much that is achingly resonant.

In this story of an ex-schoolteacher who decides to spend his final days in Varanasi on the banks of the Ganges, Shubhashish Bhutiani’s directorial debut presents a world that will be alien to European viewers,… read more
Posted in Film, Uncategorised

A Right Royal Draw-Along with Nick Sharratt, The Cat and The King, Timothy Pope and Tracy Beaker

Yesterday I went to watch Nick Sharratt do an entertaining 'drawalong' show at the corn hall. It was an amazing show and I’m very glad I got the opportunity to watch it. He came out… read more
Posted in Family, Review

East Anglian film premiere brought to life George Butterworth - a man who might have become one of Britain’s foremost composers

The Corn’s Hall’s presentation of Stewart Hajdukiewicz’s biography of composer George Butterworth may not have been quite the world premiere, but it was only the third public outing for the film, and was attended by… read more
Posted in Film, Heritage, Music

Singer ,Georgia Mancio delighted Diss Jazz Club with her interpretation of songs by Tom Jobim

Award-winning singer Georgia Mancio, brought to The Corn Hall a totally wonderful evenings music, fun and elegance. Presenting us with a beautiful musical array from the celebrated Brazilian composer Antonio Carlos 'Tom' Jobim, Georgia explained… read more
Posted in Music, Review

In an age of zero hour contracts and offshore sweatshops, Townsend productions provide a timely reminder of how effectively historical drama can resonate with the issues of today.

Rouse Ye Women – Townsend Productions Thursday 14th February Townsend Productions have been edging ever closer to contemporary issues over the last few years, with their last show - an examination of the Grunwick strike… read more
Posted in Theatre

Cold War - A sweeping, yet oddly intimate love story

Winner of the Best Director award at last year’s Cannes Festival, Paweł Pawlikowski has created a sweeping, yet oddly intimate love story about two people brought together, and then torn apart, by circumstances way beyond… read more
Posted in Film

LECTURE ON WORLD WAR ONE ART WAS ENTERTAINING, EDUCATING, AND ENRICHING

During the First World War the British government developed a variety of art schemes to bear witness to the conflict. Tania Harrington’s far reaching and ambitious talk on the subject examined how revolutionary changes in… read more
Posted in Heritage, Word, WWI

Enter the Dragon - weird and wonderful but David Vass wants more like this

Enter the Dragons - review In what amounted to a significant gear change for the Corn Hall, Abigail Dooley and Emma Edwards presented a short, sharp shock of a show that was funny, provocative, and… read more
Posted in Comedy, Review, Theatre

Open Space's Browning Version - their finest ever

The Browning Version Never shy of a challenge, Open Space Theatre Company’s latest production is a play generally regarded as Terence Rattigan’s finest. Judging by the opening night at Wingfield Barns, it may well also… read more
Posted in Open Space Theatre Company, Review, Theatre

A riotous performance of Peter Pan is captured by a drawing soldier

Last Saturday Peter Pan flew into the Corn Hall in search of his shadow and, along with the Darling family, took the Saturday Club on an amazing adventure to Neverland. There were so many pirates,… read more
Posted in Diss, Exhibitions, Family, Pantomime, Review, Theatre, Uncategorised

Common Ground's, The Mariner demonstrates just how good a touring company can be

The Mariner If there is one word to describe Common Ground’s latest production, it would be ambitious. Handsomely staged, this mix of song, music and theatre tackles both Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s life and his most… read more
Posted in Review, Theatre

4 star review of 'The Mariner' Common Ground's latest production - coming 26 Oct

Samuel Taylor Coleridge is probably as much remembered by the general public today for his troubled life and opium addiction as for his verse and association with Wordsworth’s circle. Of his poetry, the most likely… read more
Posted in Music, Review, Theatre

Toyah - Up Close & Personal at the Corn Hall

Perhaps the first British singer to be known only by her first name, Toyah entertained the Corn Hall with a string of post punk hits from the early 80s, and while for those of us… read more
Posted in Music, Review

Next Wednesday’s film - The Shape of Water – is a modern fairy tale that is both startling and uplifting

The cinema of Guillermo del Toro is notoriously dark and troubling and, although his latest film is notionally set in the US of the 1960s, it is a typically fantastical alternative version of those troubled… read more
Posted in Diss, Film, Review

Authentic and truthful, A Fantastic Woman holds a mirror up to society

If there was any doubt where director Sebastián Lelio’s was going with the Oscar Award-winning A Fantastic Woman, there’s a big clue in the film’s ironic title.  While some might find transgender Marina Vidal, played… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Christopher Plummer - a brilliant performance as cantankerous Getty in next Wednesday's film

Although loosely based on John Pearson’s book, Painfully Rich: The Outrageous Fortune and Misfortunes of the Heirs of J Paul Getty, the antecedence of Ridley Scott’s film has been largely overshadowed by the reshooting of… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Rowan Whittington Reviews Life on the Deben

I am Rowan Whittington, a student from Diss Sixth Form, taking part in the student Takeover Day at The Corn Hall. Whilst doing so, I watched the Wednesday morning showing of Life on the Deben.… read more
Posted in Diss, Film, Norfolk, Review, Training

Luke Wright & Mike Garry mesmerised at June Poetry Club

Another six months have rolled by since the last time we had a night of performance poetry at the Corn Hall, but it proved to be worth the wait, with a selection of new poems… read more
Posted in Luke Wright, Review, Stand-Up Poetry, Word

Gary Oldman’s Oscar winning performance invests the character of Churchill with doubt, humanity and righteous anger - Darkest Hour Preview

Churchill has been so lionised in reason times, that it’s both a surprise and a shock to be reminded how tenuous his authority was at the outset of the Second World War, and how capricious… read more
Posted in Diss, Film, Norfolk, Review

This Wednesday's film - heart-warming and beautifully judged

Breaking Away When movies seem split between brainless big budget blockbusters and narrow gauge art house fodder, it’s tempting to harken back to a golden age of intelligent, offbeat, cinema intended for a mainstream audience.… read more
Posted in Film, Review

In Between - David Vass previews this Wednesday's film

The idea of a dope-smoking, leather-jacketed lawyer and an aspiring DJ, opening up their home to a strait-laced, studious, ultra-conservative Muslim sounds like the setup for a credulity stretching social drama, but in the hands… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Luke Wright’s Stand-Up Poetry Club

Another six months have rolled by since the last time we had a night of performance poetry at the Corn Hall, but it proved to be worth the wait, with a selection of new poems… read more
Posted in Review, Stand-Up Poetry, Word

Young Reviewer thinks Water Babies is fantastic

"It was about a little boy who did work up a chimney, his boss forced him to do it. He jumped into the sea because his life was just work. But when he jumped into… read more
Posted in Family, Review, Theatre

Wednesday's film is a gloriously cinematic rollercoaster ride

Murder on the Orient Express Kenneth Branagh’s film adaptation of Agatha Christie’s 1934 novel is a big budget, gloriously cinematic, giddy rollercoaster ride of a movie. A nostalgic indulgence that is not just for a… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Get Out! - an intelligent thriller says reviewer David Vass

It’s a truism that the characters in thrillers frequently act irrationally, leaving their frustrated audience mute with impotent rage. All we want them to do is get out, yet they rarely follow this advice. Jordan… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Eastern Angles latest play is powerful and moving

Eastern Angles have something of a reputation for cannily focusing on regional topics which nonetheless touch on universal themes. In Nicola Werenowska’s Guesthouse, the company uses the device of a struggling B&B in Clacton to… read more
Posted in Review, Theatre

Oscar & BAFTA winning film is a beautifully photographed love letter to Northern Italy

Call Me By Your Name Set during a hot and seemingly endless summer, this beautifully photographed film is a love letter to Northern Italy, telling the minutely observed story of Elio, a grumpy teenager played… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Julius Caesar from National Theatre a hit

Shakespeare’s essay on political expediency and the fragility of power is notoriously difficult to stage effectively. With an early exit for its eponymous lead, and the closing scenes largely taken up by folk shouting and… read more
Posted in Review, Screening, Theatre

RoughCast Theatre - a bold and comedic Measure for Measure

Despite Shakespeare’s prodigious output, only a relatively small number of his plays are regularly performed, so Roughcast are to be commended for tackling one of his trickiest, problematic plays, and for making such good sense… read more
Posted in Review, Theatre

A preview of The Party, screening this Wednesday

Sally Potter’s first film since 2012 voyeuristically takes a peek at a group of self-satisfied, champagne socialists, as they tear lumps out of each other in an increasingly farcical, middle-class nightmare of social niceties,  acid… read more
Posted in Film, Review

This Wednesday's film - Goodbye Christopher Robin - previewed

Anyone expecting a sugar-coated period drama needs to approach this film with caution. Director Simon Curtis has instead delivered something altogether more substantial and troubling. Based on local author, Ann Thwaite’s biography of A A… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Townsend Productions latest is another hit with our reviewer, David Vass

We Are the Lions, Mr Manager! Townsend Productions’ latest play sees the further development of Neil Gore as a writer of increasing confidence and individuality. In this unapologetic polemic, we still got his signature mix… read more
Posted in Music, Review, Theatre

Dan Cruickshank - from heartbreaking destruction of Palmyra to the delights of Diss

Anyone coming to the Corn Hall expecting a dry, sober lecture on the history of world architecture through one hundred iconic buildings might have been a little taken aback by Dan Cruickshank’s exhilarating roller coaster… read more
Posted in Review, Word

Churchill - A preview of the Wednesday film

Winston Churchill, consumed with guilt over the tragedy of Gallipoli, remained opposed to the D-day Normandy invasion of 1944 up until the eve of the landing. Famously, it was judged the turning point of the… read more
Posted in Film, Review

My Cousin Rachel - a preview

Screening this Wednesday 24th January, Corn Hall previewer David Vass praises this new adaptation of du Maurier's classic tale. There must be something about Daphne du Maurier’s lean prose that lends itself to film adaptation,… read more
Posted in Film

Dunkirk - A Preview

The story of the Dunkirk evacuation, which saw a flotilla of small civilian vessels assist in the rescue of stranded troops from France in 1940, has been told many times before, but never with such… read more
Posted in Film, Review, Screening

Young Marx - A Preview

Karl Marx had been thrown out of Prussia, Germany, France and Belgium by the time he made a home for himself in London’s Soho, a tiny refuge for European dissidents that Richard Bean and Clive… read more
Posted in Comedy, Review, Screening, Theatre

The Sense of an Ending - A Preview

Notionally based on Julian Barnes’s novel of the same name, Ritesh Batra has refashioned Barnes’s meta-story of intrigue and misdirection into a compact and arresting puzzle that progresses with a pleasingly oblique trajectory. In place… read more
Posted in Film, Review, Screening

Great Family Fun - Aladdin at the Corn Hall

As the first year of the newly refurbished Corn Hall draws to a close, it seems only fitting that the occasion be marked with resolutely old fashioned Pantomime. Handsomely staged and dressed, Aladdin brought songs,… read more
Posted in Comedy, Family, Music, Pantomime, Refurbishment, Review, Theatre

A woman of no importance review

This was the first of several Oscar Wilde revivals by Clear Spring, a company dedicated to celebrating work written and performed under the proscenium arch, and therefore needs to be seen as an education as… read more
Posted in Review, Theatre

Baby Driver - A preview

Edgar Wright is best known for his collaboration with Simon Pegg on the Cornetto trilogy, and though his first solo venture, Scott Pilgrim, was a cult success it was also a commercial disaster. This time… read more
Posted in Film, Music, Review, Screening

Suddenly Last Summer at Wingfield Barns - A Preview

If allowed only one word to describe Open Space Theatre, then it would have to be ambitious. Not content to take on Tennessee Williams, a challenging and contrary playwright, the group have tackled one of… read more
Posted in Review, Theatre

Team Viking review

After his triumphant appearance in Jonny Donahoe’s Every Brilliant thing last year, expectation for James Rowland's return to the Corn Hall was high. Fortunately, his debut solo show proved to be worth the wait, showcasing… read more
Posted in Review, Theatre

Michael Portillo at the Corn Hall

The epitome of the consummate public speaker, Michael Portillo wandered on stage, with faux casualness, on the dot of his allotted time, and proceeded to regale a packed house with anecdotes from his time in… read more
Posted in Review, Word

The Old Curiosity Shop review

The Old Curiosity Shop by Common Ground Theatre Company The source novel for this production is an uneven, overly sentimental work that betrays its episodic origins. If you want to have a go at Dickens,… read more
Posted in Review, Theatre

Departure (15) - A Preview

Writer/director Andrew Stegall’s debut feature is a brittle, delicate window into the stifling relationship between a mother and her son, pregnant with ennui and the unspoken sadness of unfulfilled dreams and broken promises. Many will… read more
Posted in Film