Box Office: 01379 652241

DISS • NORFOLK

Category: Review

The Blues Band are better than ever in concert & on their new album

The Blues Band, and permutations of its constituent parts have come to Diss quite a few times but I don’t recall them ever playing quite so well. The reason may be The Rooster Crowed, their… read more
Posted in Music, Review

The Dave Thomas Big Blues Band delivers a masterclass in classic Chicago blues

If Dave Thomas ever took to running, I suspect he’d go for a marathon rather than a sprint. With a carefully curated set that lasted only a few minutes shy of three hours, Thomas took… read more
Posted in Diss, live entertainment, Music, Review

Gary Delaney brings down the house with his Gagsters Paradise show

You have to wonder if Gary Delaney’s brain is wired up differently from everyone else’s. His prodigious gag writing ability is such that, even before settling down to the show, he has bombarded us with… read more
Posted in Comedy, Review, Uncategorised

Rocketman - screening tomorrow - is bold, imaginative and original

Considering that both David Furnish and Elton John were producers of this film, it’s a remarkably frank and unflinching examination of Reg Dwight’s rocky path to fame and its almost disastrous consequences. Even more remarkable… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Another chance to see Fleabag on the big screen - it's a terrifically entertaining showcase for Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s considerable talents

I wonder how many others were belatedly catching up with Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s extraordinary Edinburgh debut back in 2013, kicking themselves that, at the time, they went to see something else instead? Given the global success… read more
Posted in Review, Screening

The Keeper - a watchable, engaging story of hope & humanity triumphing over bitter resentment

Marcus H Rosenmüller’s robust, no nonsense account of Bert Trautmann’s improbable, but true, journey towards a role as Manchester City’s post war goalie is a loving tribute to reconciliation and forgiveness that is a paean… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Cast your prejudices aside, you’ll be cheering over this heart-warming tale with family, East Anglia & wrestling at its heart

If you’re wondering whether a film about wrestling is for you, then wonder no more, and not just because it largely takes place in East Anglia. This heart-warming tale of a close knit, loving family… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Can You Ever Forgive Me? - you will, after seeing next week's hugely enjoyable film

Continuing the current fashion for true tales that are stranger than fiction, Marielle Heller turns Lee Israel’s improbable career as a forger into a jolly, breathless romp that skips from scene to scene. Israel’s wobbly… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Green Book - in spite of its hard hitting subject matter - is an absolute delight from beginning to end

Loosely based on Don Shirley’s tour of the Deep South of America, Peter Farrelly’s film - showing on Wednesday 21st August - is an absolute delight from beginning to end, notwithstanding its hard hitting subject… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Saoirse Ronan and Margot Robbie give powerful performances as the rivals in next week's Wednesday film

Mary Queen of Scots The rivalry between Mary Queen of Scots and Elizabeth I has been repeatedly dramatized and documented, but most often from the perspective of the English monarch and the furore surrounding the… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Roughcast's rumbustious romp of A Midsummer Night's Dream features a scene-stealing, marvellously exuberant Bottom

A Midsummer Night’s Dream RoughCast Theatre Company has never been afraid to take on challenging writing, tackling everything from Ibsen to Orton, and in their latest production they take on that most formidable of oxymorons,… read more
Posted in live entertainment, Review, Theatre

All is True - Branagh & Dench are magnificent in this film which seeks to explain the great mystery of why Shakespeare retired so suddenly

All is True (12A) Kenneth Branagh’s career is so closely associated with Shakespeare, it was perhaps inevitable that he would one day play the man himself. To that extent this is very much Branagh’s film,… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Ruby Watkinson: Work Experience Review

On the 8th July 2019, I began my weeks work experience at the Diss Corn Hall. After finding out that year 12 had to complete this compulsory week I set out to ensure that I… read more
Posted in Art, Diss, Exhibitions, Heritage, Jobs, Norfolk, Review

Ruby Whitehouse: My Work Experience at the Corn Hall 2019

  This July I have completed a week of work experience at the Corn Hall, an organisation I chose because of my interest in art and media. I was surprised by the variety of tasks… read more
Posted in Art, Diss, Exhibitions, Heritage, Jobs, Norfolk, Review

Stan & Ollie - next Wednesday's film - is a warm, affectionate delight

Stan & Ollie Jon S Baird’s gentle, unassuming biopic of the most famous double act the world has ever seen, is a warm, affectionate delight that touches on far broader issues than the pair’s final… read more
Posted in Film, Review

The Favourite - screening next Wednesday - is an eccentric, intriguing delight from beginning to end

The Favourite (15) - a review Set in the court of Queen Anne, the last of the Stuart monarchs, Yorgos Lanthimos’s quirky, profane and shamelessly anachronistic period drama is an eccentric, intriguing delight from beginning… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Old Herbaceous - a night at the theatre that was a delight from beginning to end

Old Herbacious - Kick in the Head productions Alfred Shaughnessy’s sensitive adaption of Reginald Arkell’s novel is a delight from beginning to end, cleverly distilling not just the narrative, but also the spirit of Arkell’s… read more
Posted in Review, Theatre

Ryan Gosling is excellent as Neil Armstrong in next Wednesday's film, First Man

First Man Adapted from James R Hansen’s book by Spotlight screenwriter, First Man is similar in tone to Philip Kaufman’s The Right Stuff. Sombre and respectful, this is a film that is immersed in its… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Thomas Paine play was sometimes melancholy, frequently moving, and ultimately life affirming.

Thomas Paine’s To Begin the World Over Again Thomas Paine only worked in Diss for a year, but we still make a claim on him, so it was pleasing that the playwright and performer, Ian… read more
Posted in Heritage, Review, Theatre

Wednesday 15 May - your chance to see one of the best films ever made

Ingmar Bergman's dark masterpiece, The Seventh Seal reaches back to scripture to create a nightmarish, episodic journey for Max von Sydow’s world-weary crusader, questioning everything while the long shadow of death chases him all the… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Luke Wright’s Stand-Up Poetry - a night of great pleasure

One of the great pleasures of Luke Wright’s stand-up poetry nights is hearing his new work in progress, and it was fascinating to hear his continued look inward. We heard about his mum, his dad,… read more
Posted in Luke Wright, Review, Stand-Up Poetry, Word

Next Wednesday: Bohemian Rhapsody - with a roster of superb concert recreations - is hugely enjoyable

After the much-publicised troubles that have beset this movie, it comes as a pleasant surprise that Bohemian Rhapsody is such a fun ride, with a roster of superb concert recreations, including Life Aid – where… read more
Posted in Film, Music, Review

Gillian Anderson and Lily James - superb in the National Theatre live screening of All About Eve

This adaption of a 1950s movie films its actors while they perform live, projecting them onto a screen, while yet more the actors perform live on stage - all of which has then been filmed… read more
Posted in Review, Screening, Theatre

Mary Poppins flies into the Corn Hall this Wednesday

Mary Poppins Returns Fans of the original Mary Poppins who approach this belated sequel with some trepidation need not worry. The film has been created with them in mind as much as a family audience… read more
Posted in Family, Film, Review

The Pantaloons inventive reworking of The Odyssey is a triumph!

The Pantaloons are no strangers to the inventive re-working of classic texts, but this must be their most ambitious attempt to date. Slimming down Homer’s epic Greek poem into two hours of knockabout fun is… read more
Posted in Arts Award, Review, Theatre

Lady Gaga CAN act - See her in 'A Star is Born'

A Star is Born Bradley Cooper’s version of this much told story is more a reimagining than a remake, with his fading rock star crossing paths with Lady Gaga’s ascendance as an all singing, all… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Next Wednesday's film - a master class in screen acting that is as enjoyable as it is compelling

When Joe Castleman wins the Nobel Prize for Literature his wife is delighted for him – who wouldn’t be – and yet there is something niggling away at her that isn’t fully explained by his… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Super Happy Story - genuinely good theatre with real emotional impact

A Super Happy Story (about feeling super sad)  A musical about depression and self-harm is not an easy sell. It takes imagination to write, empathy to perform, and courage to programme. Silent Uproar’s collaboration with… read more
Posted in Review, Theatre

Stranger than fiction, Wednesday's film BlacKkKlansman, is probably the best Spike Lee film in 20 years

Probably the best Spike Lee film in 20 years, this stranger than fiction story of a black man infiltrating the Ku Klux Klan mixes absurd comedy with jaw-dropping racism to brilliant effect. Both a social… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Luke Wright's latest show – Poet Laureate - is unusually thoughtful and moving

Following in the wake of his ambitious play/poems of recent years, Luke Wright’s latest show might at first appear a tad conventional, but there was a lot more going on here than just a collection… read more
Posted in Luke Wright, Review, Word

A Right Royal Draw-Along with Nick Sharratt, The Cat and The King, Timothy Pope and Tracy Beaker

Yesterday I went to watch Nick Sharratt do an entertaining 'drawalong' show at the corn hall. It was an amazing show and I’m very glad I got the opportunity to watch it. He came out… read more
Posted in Family, Review

Singer ,Georgia Mancio delighted Diss Jazz Club with her interpretation of songs by Tom Jobim

Award-winning singer Georgia Mancio, brought to The Corn Hall a totally wonderful evenings music, fun and elegance. Presenting us with a beautiful musical array from the celebrated Brazilian composer Antonio Carlos 'Tom' Jobim, Georgia explained… read more
Posted in Music, Review

A stellar cast makes The King of Thieves by far the best and most poignant cinema version of the Hatton Garden heist

The Hatton Garden heist in 2015 has already been repeatedly dramatized, but this is by far the best, and most poignant, with a stellar cast of British heavyweight actors who, much like the characters they… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Fire your imagination at ARCADIA!

This arresting collage of archive footage is notionally a movie that explores our changing relationship with the land, and opens with scenes of a bucolic and idealised countryside that will have the viewer settling in… read more
Posted in Film, Heritage, Review

'Royalty' at the Corn Hall in the shape of Paul Jones & Dave Kelly!

British blues royalty paid a visit to the Corn Hall last weekend, with Paul Jones and Dave Kelly (describing themselves as 40% the Blues Band) performing an acoustic set of blues classics. The pair made… read more
Posted in Music, Review

Allelujah! - something to celebrate!

The arrival of a new play by Alan Bennett is always something to celebrate, not least as they are increasingly rare. His latest, set in a rundown NHS hospital, is his first in six years,… read more
Posted in Review, Screening

David Vass is swept away with the surprisingly moving new production of The King and I

The King and I has long been the “problem” Rodgers and Hammerstein musical, and there is certainly a hint of condescension in a story about an English governess showing the King of Siam the error… read more
Posted in Review, Screening

Enter the Dragon - weird and wonderful but David Vass wants more like this

Enter the Dragons - review In what amounted to a significant gear change for the Corn Hall, Abigail Dooley and Emma Edwards presented a short, sharp shock of a show that was funny, provocative, and… read more
Posted in Comedy, Review, Theatre

Luke Wright's Stand Up Poetry Club presented a compelling contrast of talent

Promoted to the main auditorium, Luke Wright's Stand-Up Poetry Club swapped intimacy for elbow room in an evening dominated by the anger of men who can’t quite believe what is happening in the world. First… read more
Posted in Luke Wright, Review, Stand-Up Poetry, Theatre, Uncategorised

Open Space's Browning Version - their finest ever

The Browning Version Never shy of a challenge, Open Space Theatre Company’s latest production is a play generally regarded as Terence Rattigan’s finest. Judging by the opening night at Wingfield Barns, it may well also… read more
Posted in Open Space Theatre Company, Review, Theatre

A riotous performance of Peter Pan is captured by a drawing soldier

Last Saturday Peter Pan flew into the Corn Hall in search of his shadow and, along with the Darling family, took the Saturday Club on an amazing adventure to Neverland. There were so many pirates,… read more
Posted in Diss, Exhibitions, Family, Pantomime, Review, Theatre, Uncategorised

Next Wednesday's film, The Happy Prince, has a message which is ultimately positive

The Happy Prince Rupert Everett has written, directed and starred in this film, a project he has toiled for years to get off the ground, and his commitment and belief in the endeavour is evident… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Journey's End - the Wednesday film - is a quietly magnificent - and hugely respectful - testament to those we must not forget.

Journey’s End (12A) While watching Saul Dibb’s superb adaption of R C Sherriff's masterpiece, I found myself being continually astonished that the play on which it was based was written only 10 years after the… read more
Posted in Film, Review, WWI

Common Ground's, The Mariner demonstrates just how good a touring company can be

The Mariner If there is one word to describe Common Ground’s latest production, it would be ambitious. Handsomely staged, this mix of song, music and theatre tackles both Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s life and his most… read more
Posted in Review, Theatre

4 star review of 'The Mariner' Common Ground's latest production - coming 26 Oct

Samuel Taylor Coleridge is probably as much remembered by the general public today for his troubled life and opium addiction as for his verse and association with Wordsworth’s circle. Of his poetry, the most likely… read more
Posted in Music, Review, Theatre

ARTS AWARD STUDENTS AT THE CORN HALL VOLUNTEER WITH PETE'S FAMILY JAM AT OUR SATURDAY CLUB

On Saturday 22nd September we volunteered at Pete's Family Jam. It was a fun, light hearted 'get away' for children aged 0 to 100! The show incorporated both children and adults with easy to use… read more
Posted in Arts Award, Family, Music, Review

David Vass enjoys reliving the many hits of The Kinks

Resolutely not a tribute band, The Kast off Kinks are essentially the real thing without the Davies brothers, and have been performing their considerable back catalogue for well over 20 years. Obviously pleased to be… read more
Posted in Music, Review

Wednesday film - part comedy, part travelogue, part mystery, part romance - will delight fans of Downton Abbey

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society - Wednesday 26 Sept, 10.30am & 7.30pm Part comedy, part travelogue, part mystery, part romance, Mike Newell’s adaptation of Annie Barrows’s post-war epistolary novel is a film… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Lady Bird - next Wednesday's film - features superb performances

Depending through which end of the telescope you view Lady Bird (nominated for three Academy Awards), teenager Christine McPherson is either a bright young thing struggling against the suffocation of suburbia, or a brattish malcontent,… read more
Posted in Film, Review

I, Tonya - An absorbing tale that is both tragic and hilarious

While not exactly America’s answer to the tribulations of Eddie the Eagle (Tonya Harding was a world class athlete) this shaggy dog story is similarly fantastical and contradictory. Director Craig Gillespie busts the fourth wall… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Toyah - Up Close & Personal at the Corn Hall

Perhaps the first British singer to be known only by her first name, Toyah entertained the Corn Hall with a string of post punk hits from the early 80s, and while for those of us… read more
Posted in Music, Review

Next Wednesday's film - literate, profane and very clever.

What do you do, screenwriter and director Martin McDonagh seems to be asking, when there is nothing to be done? When a mother’s grief, following her daughter’s murder, turns to impotent rage she hits out… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Next Wednesday’s film - The Shape of Water – is a modern fairy tale that is both startling and uplifting

The cinema of Guillermo del Toro is notoriously dark and troubling and, although his latest film is notionally set in the US of the 1960s, it is a typically fantastical alternative version of those troubled… read more
Posted in Diss, Film, Review

Have you tried wolf tail soup? Our three little pigs thought it was delicious...!

On Saturday 21st July I went to watch the fantastic, child friendly performance at the Corn Hall, Three Little Pigs Tails (Young Reviewer Sophie pictured with Garlic Theatre's Iklooshar Malara).   I was extremely impressed… read more
Posted in Arts Award, Comedy, Diss, Family, Norfolk, Review, Theatre

Authentic and truthful, A Fantastic Woman holds a mirror up to society

If there was any doubt where director Sebastián Lelio’s was going with the Oscar Award-winning A Fantastic Woman, there’s a big clue in the film’s ironic title.  While some might find transgender Marina Vidal, played… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Christopher Plummer - a brilliant performance as cantankerous Getty in next Wednesday's film

Although loosely based on John Pearson’s book, Painfully Rich: The Outrageous Fortune and Misfortunes of the Heirs of J Paul Getty, the antecedence of Ridley Scott’s film has been largely overshadowed by the reshooting of… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Bethany Crow's review of Life on the Deben

During my time at the Diss Corn Hall work experience day I had the pleasure of helping steward the movie Life on the Deben and then watching this interesting documentary. Throughout the documentary you learn… read more
Posted in Diss, Film, Norfolk, Review, Training

Rowan Whittington Reviews Life on the Deben

I am Rowan Whittington, a student from Diss Sixth Form, taking part in the student Takeover Day at The Corn Hall. Whilst doing so, I watched the Wednesday morning showing of Life on the Deben.… read more
Posted in Diss, Film, Norfolk, Review, Training

Luke Wright & Mike Garry mesmerised at June Poetry Club

Another six months have rolled by since the last time we had a night of performance poetry at the Corn Hall, but it proved to be worth the wait, with a selection of new poems… read more
Posted in Luke Wright, Review, Stand-Up Poetry, Word

Gary Oldman’s Oscar winning performance invests the character of Churchill with doubt, humanity and righteous anger - Darkest Hour Preview

Churchill has been so lionised in reason times, that it’s both a surprise and a shock to be reminded how tenuous his authority was at the outset of the Second World War, and how capricious… read more
Posted in Diss, Film, Norfolk, Review

This Wednesday's film - heart-warming and beautifully judged

Breaking Away When movies seem split between brainless big budget blockbusters and narrow gauge art house fodder, it’s tempting to harken back to a golden age of intelligent, offbeat, cinema intended for a mainstream audience.… read more
Posted in Film, Review

In Between - David Vass previews this Wednesday's film

The idea of a dope-smoking, leather-jacketed lawyer and an aspiring DJ, opening up their home to a strait-laced, studious, ultra-conservative Muslim sounds like the setup for a credulity stretching social drama, but in the hands… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Luke Wright’s Stand-Up Poetry Club

Another six months have rolled by since the last time we had a night of performance poetry at the Corn Hall, but it proved to be worth the wait, with a selection of new poems… read more
Posted in Review, Stand-Up Poetry, Word

Young Reviewer thinks Water Babies is fantastic

"It was about a little boy who did work up a chimney, his boss forced him to do it. He jumped into the sea because his life was just work. But when he jumped into… read more
Posted in Family, Review, Theatre

Wednesday's film is a gloriously cinematic rollercoaster ride

Murder on the Orient Express Kenneth Branagh’s film adaptation of Agatha Christie’s 1934 novel is a big budget, gloriously cinematic, giddy rollercoaster ride of a movie. A nostalgic indulgence that is not just for a… read more
Posted in Film, Review

This Wednesday's film will keep you gripped until it's surprising conclusion

Loveless Filmed in the perpetual gloom of a snowy Russian autumn, Andrey Zvyagintsev’s latest movie paints a sombre, melancholy picture of a self-centred and supremely unsympathetic couple in the midst of an acrimonious breakup, oblivious… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Get Out! - an intelligent thriller says reviewer David Vass

It’s a truism that the characters in thrillers frequently act irrationally, leaving their frustrated audience mute with impotent rage. All we want them to do is get out, yet they rarely follow this advice. Jordan… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Eastern Angles latest play is powerful and moving

Eastern Angles have something of a reputation for cannily focusing on regional topics which nonetheless touch on universal themes. In Nicola Werenowska’s Guesthouse, the company uses the device of a struggling B&B in Clacton to… read more
Posted in Review, Theatre

Oscar & BAFTA winning film is a beautifully photographed love letter to Northern Italy

Call Me By Your Name Set during a hot and seemingly endless summer, this beautifully photographed film is a love letter to Northern Italy, telling the minutely observed story of Elio, a grumpy teenager played… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Review of Open Space production of Dancing at Lughnasa

Brain Freil’s play Dancing at Lughnasa is an uncompromising examination of how poverty so often leads to the stagnation of already challenged lives. If that sounds like a grim way to spend a couple of… read more
Posted in Review, Theatre

This Wednesday - Film Stars Don’t Die In Liverpool is refreshing and authentic, says David Vass

Loosely based on Peter Turner's account of his love affair with faded movie star Gloria Grahame, Paul McGuigan’s unassuming film Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool recounts a quiet romance between a struggling young actor… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Julius Caesar from National Theatre a hit

Shakespeare’s essay on political expediency and the fragility of power is notoriously difficult to stage effectively. With an early exit for its eponymous lead, and the closing scenes largely taken up by folk shouting and… read more
Posted in Review, Screening, Theatre

Paddington 2 wins over our reviewer, David Vass

Freed from the exposition of the little bear’s arrival in London, the sequel to Paddington gets stuck straight into the action, with a meticulously constructed screenplay that is crammed full of huge laughs, but also… read more
Posted in Film, Review

RoughCast Theatre - a bold and comedic Measure for Measure

Despite Shakespeare’s prodigious output, only a relatively small number of his plays are regularly performed, so Roughcast are to be commended for tackling one of his trickiest, problematic plays, and for making such good sense… read more
Posted in Review, Theatre

A preview of The Party, screening this Wednesday

Sally Potter’s first film since 2012 voyeuristically takes a peek at a group of self-satisfied, champagne socialists, as they tear lumps out of each other in an increasingly farcical, middle-class nightmare of social niceties,  acid… read more
Posted in Film, Review

This Wednesday's film - Goodbye Christopher Robin - previewed

Anyone expecting a sugar-coated period drama needs to approach this film with caution. Director Simon Curtis has instead delivered something altogether more substantial and troubling. Based on local author, Ann Thwaite’s biography of A A… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Townsend Productions latest is another hit with our reviewer, David Vass

We Are the Lions, Mr Manager! Townsend Productions’ latest play sees the further development of Neil Gore as a writer of increasing confidence and individuality. In this unapologetic polemic, we still got his signature mix… read more
Posted in Music, Review, Theatre

Dan Cruickshank - from heartbreaking destruction of Palmyra to the delights of Diss

Anyone coming to the Corn Hall expecting a dry, sober lecture on the history of world architecture through one hundred iconic buildings might have been a little taken aback by Dan Cruickshank’s exhilarating roller coaster… read more
Posted in Review, Word

David Vass reviews Corn Hall Comedy

If riffing off an audience without the safety net of prepared material is a sign of a fine compère, then Andrew Ryan is the epitome of that rare and special talent. Twenty minutes into his… read more
Posted in Comedy, Review

Wednesday film preview - La Belle et la Bête (Beauty and the Beast)

La Belle et la Bête was directed by Jean Cocteau, one of the most multi-talented artists of the 20th century. In addition to being a director, he was a poet, novelist, painter, playwright, set designer,… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Churchill - A preview of the Wednesday film

Winston Churchill, consumed with guilt over the tragedy of Gallipoli, remained opposed to the D-day Normandy invasion of 1944 up until the eve of the landing. Famously, it was judged the turning point of the… read more
Posted in Film, Review

A preview of Wednesday film - A Man Called Ove

Hannes Holm’s adaptation of Fredrik Backman’s bestselling novel is that rarest of things, a film that improves on its source material. In place of Backman’s broad brush comedy, Holm presents an altogether more nuanced take… read more
Posted in Film, Review, Screening

Dunkirk - A Preview

The story of the Dunkirk evacuation, which saw a flotilla of small civilian vessels assist in the rescue of stranded troops from France in 1940, has been told many times before, but never with such… read more
Posted in Film, Review, Screening

Young Marx - A Preview

Karl Marx had been thrown out of Prussia, Germany, France and Belgium by the time he made a home for himself in London’s Soho, a tiny refuge for European dissidents that Richard Bean and Clive… read more
Posted in Comedy, Review, Screening, Theatre

The Sense of an Ending - A Preview

Notionally based on Julian Barnes’s novel of the same name, Ritesh Batra has refashioned Barnes’s meta-story of intrigue and misdirection into a compact and arresting puzzle that progresses with a pleasingly oblique trajectory. In place… read more
Posted in Film, Review, Screening

Great Family Fun - Aladdin at the Corn Hall

As the first year of the newly refurbished Corn Hall draws to a close, it seems only fitting that the occasion be marked with resolutely old fashioned Pantomime. Handsomely staged and dressed, Aladdin brought songs,… read more
Posted in Comedy, Family, Music, Pantomime, Refurbishment, Review, Theatre

Audiences are loving Aladdin!

Here are some facebook reviews 5*  Just got home from Diss Panto...we had such a great time and we all vary in ages so it suited everyone. Full of laughter fun, singing, dancing..the lot!!! Lee Peck… read more
Posted in Comedy, Family, Pantomime, Review, Theatre

A woman of no importance review

This was the first of several Oscar Wilde revivals by Clear Spring, a company dedicated to celebrating work written and performed under the proscenium arch, and therefore needs to be seen as an education as… read more
Posted in Review, Theatre

Baby Driver - A preview

Edgar Wright is best known for his collaboration with Simon Pegg on the Cornetto trilogy, and though his first solo venture, Scott Pilgrim, was a cult success it was also a commercial disaster. This time… read more
Posted in Film, Music, Review, Screening

Suddenly Last Summer at Wingfield Barns - A Preview

If allowed only one word to describe Open Space Theatre, then it would have to be ambitious. Not content to take on Tennessee Williams, a challenging and contrary playwright, the group have tackled one of… read more
Posted in Review, Theatre

Team Viking review

After his triumphant appearance in Jonny Donahoe’s Every Brilliant thing last year, expectation for James Rowland's return to the Corn Hall was high. Fortunately, his debut solo show proved to be worth the wait, showcasing… read more
Posted in Review, Theatre

Michael Portillo at the Corn Hall

The epitome of the consummate public speaker, Michael Portillo wandered on stage, with faux casualness, on the dot of his allotted time, and proceeded to regale a packed house with anecdotes from his time in… read more
Posted in Review, Word

The Old Curiosity Shop review

The Old Curiosity Shop by Common Ground Theatre Company The source novel for this production is an uneven, overly sentimental work that betrays its episodic origins. If you want to have a go at Dickens,… read more
Posted in Review, Theatre

I am Not Your Negro (12) - A Preview

Novelist and playwright James Baldwin is perhaps best known for his social essays on the deeply divided US society that surrounded him, not least his unfinished manuscript Remember This House, a personal memoir of Malcolm… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Finding Joy - A Review

Finding Joy – Vamos Theatre at the Corn Hall The ancient Greeks knew a thing or two. Mask theatre, when done well, manages to tap into something deeply emotional, almost primal, in a way conventional… read more
Posted in Review, Theatre

Moonlight (15)- A Preview

Inspired by playwright Tarell Alvin McCraney’s postgraduate theatre project “In Moonlight Black Boys Look Blue”, Barry Jenkins’s second film is a remarkably assured portrait of three key moments in a young man’s life. Laden with… read more
Posted in Film, Review

NOTES ON BLINDNESS (U) - A Preview

Directed by Peter Middleton & James Spinney, UK, 2016, 90 mins With Dan Skinner, John Hull, Marilyn Hull When John Hill realised he was going blind, he started recording his thoughts and feelings on tape,… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Dr Phil’s Health Revolution - A Review

Phil Hammond was quick to embrace the brilliance of universal healthcare, but also admit to its shortcomings, in his frank and candid talk on the NHS, how he came to work within it, and the… read more
Posted in Review, Word

Professor Robert Winston - A Review

Robert Winston made no concessions to the faint hearted with his fascinating talk that explored the ethical considerations increasingly brought to bear on a medical profession now able to make quite extraordinary genetic modifications to… read more
Posted in Review, Word

A Review: Saturday Club - Nick Cope

Last weekend I went to the Saturday club at the reopened Corn Hall, where I saw Nick Cope doing a performance for all the family! Nick sang a variety of songs that were all very… read more
Posted in Family, Review

A Review: Lady Maisery

Billed as a welcome return of folk music to the Corn Hall, Lady Maisery offered up something altogether richer and more varied. Hannah James, Rowan Rheingans and Hazel Askew showcased their considerable music talents with… read more
Posted in Music, Review

A Street Cat Named Bob  - A Preview

Based on James Bowen's bestselling autobiographical book, A Street Cat Named Bob is a heart-warming, yet surprisingly unflinching, examination of homelessness and drug dependency.  Bob, a ginger stray, comes into Bowen’s life, and in doing… read more
Posted in Film, Review

A Review: Burton by Gwynne Edwards

Richard Burton was a fascinating, contrary man that defied the logic of a job for life down the pit to become an international superstar, only to have his private life then eclipse his acting achievements.… read more
Posted in Review, Theatre

ALLIED (15) - A Preview

Wednesday 26 April, 8pm at Diss High School as part of Corn Hall on tour, book tickets here. Robert Zemeckis has made a specialism of exploiting film wizardry to startling effect, from the insertion of… read more
Posted in Film, Review

See How They Run - A Preview

Open Space’s occasional foray into British farce continued with their opening night of Philip King’s famous wartime comedy. Written and set during World War II, it’s a fascinating insight into psyche of a nation laughing… read more
Posted in Review, Theatre

FANTASTIC BEASTS AND WHERE TO FIND THEM (12A) - A Preview

15 March 7.30pm, Diss High School Directed by David Yates, UK/USA, 2016, 133 mins With Eddie Redmayne, Samantha Morton, Katherine Waterston Harry Potter’s world is so quintessentially British, that reimagining wizardry in a New York setting… read more
Posted in Film, Review

I, Daniel Blake (15) - A Preview

I, DANIEL BLAKE (15) Directed by Ken Loach, UK, 2016, 100 mins With Dave Johns, Haley Squires, Sharon Percy After the whimsy of Angel’s Share and the sentimentality of Jimmy’s Hall there were whispers that… read more
Posted in Film, Review

Corn Hall Comedy Club - A Review

This was probably the very last outing for the Corn Hall Comedy night at the Rugby Club before it returns to its natural home – a varied and lively night that had MC Keiran Boyd… read more
Posted in Comedy, Review